Kelley Li's Interracial Fiction & Fan-Fiction

TALK TO ME   39. Black. American. Multi-cultural Heritage.Bisexual.Anomaly. Unique. Single Mom of Biracial Autistic Tween Son.

Supporter of all kinds of interracial relationships (IRL or Fiction).

Supporter of:
Asexual.Bisexual.Heterosexual.Homosexual.Polysexuality.Pansexuality.Transgender. Any Sexual orientation.

I love all genres of music. From Acapella to Zydeco and in between, even Country. I just don't like everyone who makes an album or calls themselves a 'musician' or a 'singer'.

This is a blog where I ship Amber Riley, Roughley,Mercedes Jones, Samcedes,All the Cedes ships,All the Riley ships, Interracial Relationships of all kinds-whether real or fictional relationships.


I still ship and will forever ship SAMCEDES & AMBER RILEY!

WARNING: AND THIS IS NOT A SPOILER-FREE ZONE OF ANY KIND!

AND THIS IS AN AMBER RILEY /MERCEDES JONES/SAMCEDES/BLACK WOMEN IN INTERRACIAL RELATIONSHIPS (WHETHER FICTION OR NON-FICTION) WORSHIP BLOG AS WELL!

twitter.com/KelleyLi1974:

    Karma - Lady (lyrics) →

    I have been listening to this since I first heard early this morning at the end of True Blood Season 7, Episode 6 with the same name. I have fallen in love with this song so much I had to find the lyrics. Just so I can learn every word.

    (Verse)
    Ain’t nobody worthier than you
    Seen all the crazy things and stupid things you do
    Keep walking around like it never could happen to you.
    You might as well get ready, you’re about to triffle your own good.

    (Chorus)
    So maybe you deserve it,
    Maybe you deserve it
    This little thing called karma,
    Karma, karma,
    This little thing called karma,
    Karma, karma.

    (Verse)
     So quick to point the finger,
     remember three is pointin’ back at you

        Always first to judge
        Oh but the guilty one is you
        I know I ain’t no saint
        But I know I ain’t as bad as you
        Don’t you think it’s time to change
        And maybe become a better you

    I don’t really understand it,
    Tell me why
    Don’t you ever wanna feel the sunshine?

    (Chorus)
    Maybe you deserve
    Karma, karma, karma.
    Maybe you deserve, I don’t know
    But I think you do.
    Karma, karma, karma.
    Maybe you do, maybe you do.

    — 5 hours ago with 1 note
    #karma  #LADY  #lyrics  #true blood season 7 episode 6 
    UPDATES & NEW STORIES AT Change Of Heart →
    — 8 hours ago
    #Kelley Li's interracial fiction and fan-fiction  #interracial fan-fiction  #interracial original fiction 

    it-still-smells-like-sulphur:

    221cbakerstreet:

    qwanderer:

    thisisevenharderthannamingablog:

    girl-farts:

    kingcheddarxvii:

    notviolet:

    Chris Pratt Interrupts Interview To French Braid Intern’s Hair

    SHUT THE HELL U P

    this man has gone too far

    damn

    Where does Marvel FIND these people?

    Imagine - Chris Pratt and Jeremy Renner show up to your door the night of prom and your parents are like WHY DO YOU HAVE TWO DATES AND WHY ARE THEY SO BIG AND BEEFY AND INTIMIDATING but Chris is just like “Nah I’m hair” and Jeremy raises his hand and says “And I’m makeup”

    surprisingly well done

    Literally better than what I can do and French braids are my go to …

    (Source: chrisprattdelicious, via doctorblainewilliams)

    — 8 hours ago with 176154 notes

    LADY - KARMA ( TRUTH & SOUL RECORDS )

    I just finished watching episode 6 of true blood and this song plays at the end (it’s also the title of the episode) and it’s omg- i love this song I have to buy it. The name of the band/musicians is Lady and this is their song! My new anthem..lol!

    — 12 hours ago with 2 notes
    #karma  #true blood music  #true blood final season  #LADY 
    Kristin Bauer’s True Blood Series Finale Preview Reduces Her to Tears!

We might want to start stocking TVLine’s San Diego Comic-Con video suite with Kleenex, just to be prepared for interviews like Kristin Bauer‘s.

The True Blood actress got a little verklempt when telling Michael Ausiello about shooting her final scenes as vampy vampire Pam on the HBO drama, which wraps for good in August. Particularly touching: Her remembrance of the final time she and co-star Alex Skarsgard acted together.

RELATED True Blood‘s Lauren Bowles on Season 7 Wedding Bells, Chances for a Movie

“My last scene with Alex, I was toast,” she says, later joking that the emotional final episodes left her “dehyrdated” from so much crying and adding that Comic-Con (!) was the thing that got her through some sad times on set.

Press PLAY on the video at the top of the post to hear Bauer talk about a missing moment of mourning for Tara, some prerequisites for her next TV gig (hint: anything involving a “five-hour pre-makeup call” isn’t at the top of her list) and what we can expect from Pam and a Hep V-suffering Eric as the series draws to a close.

    Kristin Bauer’s True Blood Series Finale Preview Reduces Her to Tears!

    We might want to start stocking TVLine’s San Diego Comic-Con video suite with Kleenex, just to be prepared for interviews like Kristin Bauer‘s.

    The True Blood actress got a little verklempt when telling Michael Ausiello about shooting her final scenes as vampy vampire Pam on the HBO drama, which wraps for good in August. Particularly touching: Her remembrance of the final time she and co-star Alex Skarsgard acted together.

    RELATED True Blood‘s Lauren Bowles on Season 7 Wedding Bells, Chances for a Movie

    “My last scene with Alex, I was toast,” she says, later joking that the emotional final episodes left her “dehyrdated” from so much crying and adding that Comic-Con (!) was the thing that got her through some sad times on set.

    Press PLAY on the video at the top of the post to hear Bauer talk about a missing moment of mourning for Tara, some prerequisites for her next TV gig (hint: anything involving a “five-hour pre-makeup call” isn’t at the top of her list) and what we can expect from Pam and a Hep V-suffering Eric as the series draws to a close.

    — 1 day ago with 1 note
    #True Blood True Blood season 7 Comic Con 2014 True Blood final season Kristin Bauer 
    Sleepy Hollow Stars Talk ‘Trippy’ Purgatory, Abbie’s Mom and the Cranes’ ‘Wonderfully Destructive’ Son

War, what is it good for?

How about “huge” Sleepy Hollow drama?

RELATED Sleepy Hollow @ Comic-Con: ‘Whatever You Think Is Coming, Isn’t’

The Fox drama’s Tom Mison, Nicole Beharie, Katia Winter and new series regulars John Noble and Lyndie Greenwood stopped by TVLine’s San Diego Comic-Con video suite to talk to Michael Ausiello about that damning Season 1 finale and how quickly it will (or won’t) be unwound come Monday, Sept. 22.

“We give you long enough to enjoy me being in the box,” Mison quipped of Ichabod’s seemingly inescapable fate, buried alive in his late son’s coffin.

Abbie meanwhile is trapped in a “trippy” Purgatory, Beharie says — a special hell that is “very personal” for her.

But no hell is worse than the “wonderfully destructive” fury Henry aka War is itching to unleash on dear ol’ Mom and Dad, Noble grins.

Also in the above video Q&A: the Sleepy stars talk about Abbie and Jenny’s “supernatural” mother, whether or not Katrina is “jealous” of the woman that’s been in Ichabod’s life and the current-day ramifications of meeting Ichabod’s first fiancée.

    Sleepy Hollow Stars Talk ‘Trippy’ Purgatory, Abbie’s Mom and the Cranes’ ‘Wonderfully Destructive’ Son

    War, what is it good for?

    How about “huge” Sleepy Hollow drama?

    RELATED Sleepy Hollow @ Comic-Con: ‘Whatever You Think Is Coming, Isn’t’

    The Fox drama’s Tom Mison, Nicole Beharie, Katia Winter and new series regulars John Noble and Lyndie Greenwood stopped by TVLine’s San Diego Comic-Con video suite to talk to Michael Ausiello about that damning Season 1 finale and how quickly it will (or won’t) be unwound come Monday, Sept. 22.

    “We give you long enough to enjoy me being in the box,” Mison quipped of Ichabod’s seemingly inescapable fate, buried alive in his late son’s coffin.

    Abbie meanwhile is trapped in a “trippy” Purgatory, Beharie says — a special hell that is “very personal” for her.

    But no hell is worse than the “wonderfully destructive” fury Henry aka War is itching to unleash on dear ol’ Mom and Dad, Noble grins.

    Also in the above video Q&A: the Sleepy stars talk about Abbie and Jenny’s “supernatural” mother, whether or not Katrina is “jealous” of the woman that’s been in Ichabod’s life and the current-day ramifications of meeting Ichabod’s first fiancée.

    — 1 day ago with 4 notes
    #sleepy hollow comic con 2014 
    Comic-Con: 'Supernatural' Boss Calls 200th Episode 'Love Letter to the Fans' →

    Supernatural had a rollicking good time opening Hall H on the final day of Comic-Con.

    The season-nine finale saw Dean Winchester turned into a demon and the consequences of that change up in the air. “It has an enormous effect on the season and on the brothers,” said executive producer Jeremy Carver of the introduction of Demon Dean. “It’s part of the opening episodes. Sam, in particular, [digs into] how to rescue his brother. Dean … struggles with what exactly that means.”

    "Myself and the other writers are excited most of all that the idea of these brothers questioning who the real monster is," added Carver. "It’s great and it’s exciting and emotional and fun."

    For Jensen Ackles, who directed the third episode of the season (more on that later), the shift in Dean’s character was a welcomed change. “This is actually Dean’s soul that is twisted. It was interesting trying to make it a different character but at the same time, be the same character &mdash but twisted and demonic,” he said. Hall H was treated to a special first look at the third episode of Supernatural, directed by Ackles, which is the first time Dean confronts Sam after he’s been turned into a demon.

    A fading Castiel, meanwhile, will spend a good portion of his time “helping Dean getting patched up” instead of “recovering his own powers,” said Misha Collins.

    The long-running drama hits its 200th milestone episode in November and Carver promised that the hour will be “a love letter to the fans” of The CW show and have “musical-ish” elements. “It’s wonderful to thank you guys on screen,” said Jared Padalecki. The premiere, in fact, will also have a heavy dose of music with singing and “rump-shaking,” Carver teased. “Apparently Demon Dean likes to karaoke, or does he?” Ackles joked.

    Supernatural has famous fans and one of them is William Shatner, who has live-tweeted episodes of the show. When asked about the chances of Shatner appearing, Collins was all for the idea. “He’d have to audition with everyone else,” he joked.

    Among the other highlights were the annual screening of the previous season’s gag reel and a surprise appearance by Osric Chau, who played Kevin Tran.

    — 1 day ago
    #supernatural comic con 2014 

    The Vampire Diaries - Meanwhile on The Other Side

    ….Of course, Bonnie (Kat Graham) and Damon (Ian Somerhalder) are coming back, right? CW’s “Vampire Diaries” boss Julie Plec and the cast aren’t telling.

    Saturday’s panel began with a video starting just as the other side was imploding with Bonnie and Damon in it. But, the lights do go back on to reveal the actors on an empty soundstage wondering if they’ve been written off of the show. Their castmates took a good amount of time surveying what was left behind. Will they get more beefed up parts, bigger paychecks, new and returning characters who’ll fill the gaps?…

    Watch the video above.

    — 1 day ago with 18 notes
    #the vampire diaries season 6  #Kat Graham  #ian somerhalder  #bonnie bennett  #damon salvatore  #comic con 2014 
    ‘Vampire Diaries’ Boss and Stars Discuss Saying Goodbye to Damon and Bonnie in Season 6 (Video)
Of course, Bonnie (Kat Graham) and Damon (Ian Somerhalder) are coming back, right? CW’s “Vampire Diaries” boss Julie Plec and the cast aren’t telling.
Saturday’s panel began with a video starting just as the other side was imploding with Bonnie and Damon in it. But, the lights do go back on to reveal the actors on an empty soundstage wondering if they’ve been written off of the show. Their castmates took a good amount of time surveying what was left behind. Will they get more beefed up parts, bigger paychecks, new and returning characters who’ll fill the gaps?
 “What’s the result of the other side being destroyed? Anybody who’s ever died before can’t come back,” showrunner Julie Plec said. “It’s equal parts heartbreaking and good.
For example, it did give the show a chance to pull back some characters we missed, such as Alaric (Matt Davis).
Plec revealed that there will be a four-month time jump when Season 6 begins. That allows the show to start where everyone’s made some “big choices” and they’re trying to work out how to move forward. Some are doing well, others not so much.
For Elena? “She’s definitely not in a happy place, though she has a confusing, strange way to deal with the grief,” Nina Dobrev said.
And how does Alaric fit in? “We find Alaric living outside Mystic Falls and teaching at the local university,” Davis said. Plec reveals there’s some romance in his future.
“I think people do get naughty in our universe, and if anyone deserves a little naughtiness it’s probably Professor Saltzman,” Plec said.
As for other relationships, Dobrev weighed in on a possible Stefan (Paul Wesley)-Caroline (Candice Accola) coupling. She said it would be hypocritical of Elena to get mad about Stefan dating her best friend — after all, she dated both brothers.
 “Stefan has been good. He deserves some action,” Wesley interjected.
One fan asked if it’s possible for Elena and Stefan to rekindle their relationship. Plec sounds like she’s pretty happy with them being friends and that missing Damon will be the focus for Elena for a while.
Alaric will play a fatherly role with Jeremy (Steven McQueen), who’s being told to move on by some. His response? “How dare you, no one has gone through what I’ve gone through,” Plec paraphrased.
So, back to the first question: When will Bonnie and Damon come back from wherever they ended up? No one is saying for sure.
“These new dynamics are exciting for us,” Somerhalder said. “Change is good.”
“I wasn’t sad, I actually felt empowered,” Graham said of Bonnie’s last scene. “In the end, it was her choice.”

    ‘Vampire Diaries’ Boss and Stars Discuss Saying Goodbye to Damon and Bonnie in Season 6 (Video)

    Of course, Bonnie (Kat Graham) and Damon (Ian Somerhalder) are coming back, right? CW’s “Vampire Diaries” boss Julie Plec and the cast aren’t telling.

    Saturday’s panel began with a video starting just as the other side was imploding with Bonnie and Damon in it. But, the lights do go back on to reveal the actors on an empty soundstage wondering if they’ve been written off of the show. Their castmates took a good amount of time surveying what was left behind. Will they get more beefed up parts, bigger paychecks, new and returning characters who’ll fill the gaps?


    “What’s the result of the other side being destroyed? Anybody who’s ever died before can’t come back,” showrunner Julie Plec said. “It’s equal parts heartbreaking and good.

    For example, it did give the show a chance to pull back some characters we missed, such as Alaric (Matt Davis).

    Plec revealed that there will be a four-month time jump when Season 6 begins. That allows the show to start where everyone’s made some “big choices” and they’re trying to work out how to move forward. Some are doing well, others not so much.

    For Elena? “She’s definitely not in a happy place, though she has a confusing, strange way to deal with the grief,” Nina Dobrev said.

    And how does Alaric fit in? “We find Alaric living outside Mystic Falls and teaching at the local university,” Davis said. Plec reveals there’s some romance in his future.

    “I think people do get naughty in our universe, and if anyone deserves a little naughtiness it’s probably Professor Saltzman,” Plec said.

    As for other relationships, Dobrev weighed in on a possible Stefan (Paul Wesley)-Caroline (Candice Accola) coupling. She said it would be hypocritical of Elena to get mad about Stefan dating her best friend — after all, she dated both brothers.


    “Stefan has been good. He deserves some action,” Wesley interjected.

    One fan asked if it’s possible for Elena and Stefan to rekindle their relationship. Plec sounds like she’s pretty happy with them being friends and that missing Damon will be the focus for Elena for a while.

    Alaric will play a fatherly role with Jeremy (Steven McQueen), who’s being told to move on by some. His response? “How dare you, no one has gone through what I’ve gone through,” Plec paraphrased.

    So, back to the first question: When will Bonnie and Damon come back from wherever they ended up? No one is saying for sure.

    “These new dynamics are exciting for us,” Somerhalder said. “Change is good.”

    “I wasn’t sad, I actually felt empowered,” Graham said of Bonnie’s last scene. “In the end, it was her choice.”

    — 1 day ago with 3 notes
    #bonnie bennett damon salvatore kat grahamIan Somerhalder the vampire diaries season 6  #comic con 2014 
    Sexual harassment at Comic-Con in the spotlight

Costumed characters walk outside of the convention center on day 1 of the 2014 Comic-Con International Convention held Thursday, July 24, 2014 in San Diego. (Photo by Denis Poroy/Invision/AP)
.

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — allegations of sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.

Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.

Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.

Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.

Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.

"It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."

"Comic-Con has an explicit Code of Conduct that addresses harassing and offensive behavior," said Comic-Con International in a statement on Sunday to The Associated Press. "This Code of Conduct is made available online as well as on page two of the Events Guide that is given to each attendee."

Earlier, Comic-Con spokesman David Glanzer told the Los Angeles Times that “anyone being made to feel uncomfortable at our show is obviously a concern for us.” He said additional security was in place this year, including an increased presence by San Diego Police.

Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.

Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”

In addition to Comic-Con’s Code of Conduct, Geeks for CONsent wants the 45-year-old convention to adopt a clearly stated policy and says staff members should to be trained to handle sexual harassment complaints.

"It makes it feel safer for the person being harassed to report it and also for bystanders who witness (inappropriate behavior)," Keyhan said.

Toni Darling, a 24-year-old model who was dressed as Wonder Woman on Saturday, said the issue goes way beyond Comic-Con.

"I don’t think it has anything to do with cosplay or anything to do with costumes," she said. "People who are the kind of people who are going to take a photo of you when you’re not looking from behind are going to do that regardless, whether you’re in costume or not."

Still, she’d like to see an advisory in the Comic-Con program against surreptitious photography, and a clearer statement from Geeks for CONsent. She found some fans were afraid to take photos, even when she was posing at a booth on the showroom floor.

"The kind of behavior that needs to be modified," she said, "is somebody taking a photo of you bent over while you’re signing a print."

    Sexual harassment at Comic-Con in the spotlight

    Costumed characters walk outside of the convention center on day 1 of the 2014 Comic-Con International Convention held Thursday, July 24, 2014 in San Diego. (Photo by Denis Poroy/Invision/AP)
    .

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — allegations of sexual harassment at the annual comic book convention.

    Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con.

    Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they’d been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day festival.

    Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued at this year’s convention. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.

    Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the pop-culture convention where fantasy and character costumes play such a large role.

    "It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space," said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. "It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space."

    "Comic-Con has an explicit Code of Conduct that addresses harassing and offensive behavior," said Comic-Con International in a statement on Sunday to The Associated Press. "This Code of Conduct is made available online as well as on page two of the Events Guide that is given to each attendee."

    Earlier, Comic-Con spokesman David Glanzer told the Los Angeles Times that “anyone being made to feel uncomfortable at our show is obviously a concern for us.” He said additional security was in place this year, including an increased presence by San Diego Police.

    Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.

    Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”

    In addition to Comic-Con’s Code of Conduct, Geeks for CONsent wants the 45-year-old convention to adopt a clearly stated policy and says staff members should to be trained to handle sexual harassment complaints.

    "It makes it feel safer for the person being harassed to report it and also for bystanders who witness (inappropriate behavior)," Keyhan said.

    Toni Darling, a 24-year-old model who was dressed as Wonder Woman on Saturday, said the issue goes way beyond Comic-Con.

    "I don’t think it has anything to do with cosplay or anything to do with costumes," she said. "People who are the kind of people who are going to take a photo of you when you’re not looking from behind are going to do that regardless, whether you’re in costume or not."

    Still, she’d like to see an advisory in the Comic-Con program against surreptitious photography, and a clearer statement from Geeks for CONsent. She found some fans were afraid to take photos, even when she was posing at a booth on the showroom floor.

    "The kind of behavior that needs to be modified," she said, "is somebody taking a photo of you bent over while you’re signing a print."

    — 1 day ago with 2 notes
    #comic con comic con 2014 
    Summer Blockbusters Need More Crappy Roles for Women
To judge strictly from this week’s news, things are looking up for women in movies. This weekend’s action thriller Lucy, in which Scarlett Johansson obtains superhuman powers, is leading advance ticket sales on Fandango. Meanwhile, director Joss Whedon, interviewed at the Guardians of the Galaxy premiere, revealed that there would be four major female roles in Avengers 2: Age of Ultron.
If only these were signs of some kind of larger progress. For the most part, this summer’s major films have been dismally lacking in decent roles for women. Not that this is news. Every single summer brings more essays about that very subject. That’s why I want to stop talking, for the moment, about women getting decent roles, and start talking about women getting any roles. Even crappy ones.
Right now, box office revenues in North America are down 20 percent. Per The Hollywood Reporter, one of the reasons for that drop is that women aren’t showing up to the big movies. Even though more than half of current moviegoers are women (52 percent, as of last year), they made up only 36 percent of the debut audience for Transformers and 39 percent for Amazing Spider-Man 2. Big studio films are suffering, because a huge percentage of their audience isn’t showing up.
Maybe it’s not a coincidence that the minority of women in the audience reflects the minority of women onscreen. Using IMDB (an imperfect but good-enough resource), I added up the numbers of female and male characters in several of this summer’s highest-grossing films. Among the main characters in Godzilla (which I’m defining as anybody with an actual name) there are 19 men and 4 women. Transformers: Age of Extinction has 7 major male characters, 3 human female characters, and 8 male robots. X-Men: Days of Future Past has 26 men and 7 women. Maleficent is the exception to the trend, with 10 lead female roles (including the actresses who played characters at different ages) and 6 male roles. Guess which film performed best among women?
Vulture writer Kyle Buchanan recently brought up this issue with Matt Reeves, the director of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, my favorite summer blockbuster so far, in which only two women have names: a human doctor played by Keri Russell and an ape played by Judy Greer. In contrast, there are 19 named roles for male actors. Buchanan asked Apes director Matt Reeves about this discrepancy, and his answer — “It wasn’t a conscious decision. I don’t know.” — is very telling. For all the effort he poured into every detail of that movie, the thought of including more female characters never crossed his mind.
Movies, and genre movies in particular, have suffered this male-female imbalance for a long time. It’s what Katha Pollitt, in 1991, dubbed “The Smurfette Principle,” noting that many stories about men contain a single, often stereotypical female character, thus establishing a world that is defined by men, in which women are peripheral. At least these days, filmmakers are making some effort to elevate these precious few roles. Russell’s character in Apes and Elisabeth Olsen’s character in Godzilla are doctors. Zoe Saldana’s character in Guardians of the Galaxy is a bounty hunter. The summer’s best female character, played by Emily Blunt in Edge of Tomorrow, is an army sergeant.
But having just one or two female characters in a movie, even in relatively empowered positions, means that women in the audience are always going to be underserved. As Shana Mlawski wrote in the widely-circulated “Why Strong Female Characters are Bad for Women,” the emphasis on female characters being “sexy yet strong” often means that they lack any other personality traits: They can’t be funny, or vulnerable, or any other quality that makes a character relatable. Tasha Robinson’s essay on The Dissolve, “We’re Losing All Our Strong Female Characters to Trinity Syndrome,” applauds a few recent movies (How to Train Your Dragon 2, Pacific Rim, The Lego Movie) for creating great female characters, but notes that all of these characters ultimately step aside so that the male hero can save the day.
Point being, these vastly outnumbered female characters are carrying far too much on their shoulders. They wouldn’t all have to juggle motherhood, romance, monster-fighting, and promising medical careers — then ditch it all when a damsel-in-distress is required — if there were more women to share these roles. That’s why we don’t just need more good roles for women; we need crappy roles, too. We need female characters who are bus drivers, students, villains, janitors, drug addicts, politicians, and superheroes. Hollywood is full of terrific, underemployed actresses of all types. There’s no reason that every miscellaneous role in a movie needs to default to “male.”
By “crappy parts,” I’m not talking about giving all the tiny parts to women, though that would be something. I’m talking about splitting things clean down the middle. Take Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, for example. As Buchanan pointed out, Gary Oldman’s character could have easily been played by a woman, and the main character’s teenage son could have been a daughter. Half the ape society could have been female. None of these are particularly amazing roles, and making them women wouldn’t have changed the story one bit — yet it would have been quietly revolutionary.
Or take Godzilla, which features some wonderful actors in thankless roles, and some wonderful actresses in even more thankless roles. It would have been very easy to switch any two male and female roles without otherwise altering the script. Juliette Binoche could have been the Godzilla-obsessed parent, rather than Bryan Cranston. Sally Hawkins could have been the main scientist, with Ken Watanabe playing Scientist Who Nods a Lot. And what if Elisabeth Olsen had been the bomb expert trying to save her city, and Aaron Taylor Johnson played the dad nervously waiting at home? That would have been something new.
Pandering to women doesn’t make for a surefire hit, but there’s enough evidence that women turn out for movies in which they’re represented. Two summer films that performed far better than expected, the big-budget Maleficent and the indie The Fault in Our Stars, contained many parts for women (and, not for nothing, were marketed to female audiences). The mega-successful Hunger Games movies boast an onscreen gender ratio that is nearly 50/50. The Avengers owed 40 percent of its record-breaking opening weekend to women; though inarguably a male-dominated movie, it has one female lead and two key supporting female characters, and women actually appear onscreen nearly as often as the men.
It’s not that female moviegoers are keeping a running tally of women and buying their tickets accordingly. It’s just that, when you’re consistently excluded, you start to notice. If women took up as much space onscreen as they do in movie audiences — 52 percent — films would look very different. Audiences would acclimate to the idea that female characters have their own stories. And perhaps those “strong female characters” would naturally emerge, instead of being shoehorned into the plot. When Matt Reeves says that excluding women from Apes wasn’t “a conscious decision,” I believe him. But that excuse is wearing thin. I want to see directors start making conscious decisions to include women — one crappy role at a time.

    Summer Blockbusters Need More Crappy Roles for Women

    To judge strictly from this week’s news, things are looking up for women in movies. This weekend’s action thriller Lucy, in which Scarlett Johansson obtains superhuman powers, is leading advance ticket sales on Fandango. Meanwhile, director Joss Whedon, interviewed at the Guardians of the Galaxy premiere, revealed that there would be four major female roles in Avengers 2: Age of Ultron.

    If only these were signs of some kind of larger progress. For the most part, this summer’s major films have been dismally lacking in decent roles for women. Not that this is news. Every single summer brings more essays about that very subject. That’s why I want to stop talking, for the moment, about women getting decent roles, and start talking about women getting any roles. Even crappy ones.

    Right now, box office revenues in North America are down 20 percent. Per The Hollywood Reporter, one of the reasons for that drop is that women aren’t showing up to the big movies. Even though more than half of current moviegoers are women (52 percent, as of last year), they made up only 36 percent of the debut audience for Transformers and 39 percent for Amazing Spider-Man 2. Big studio films are suffering, because a huge percentage of their audience isn’t showing up.

    Maybe it’s not a coincidence that the minority of women in the audience reflects the minority of women onscreen. Using IMDB (an imperfect but good-enough resource), I added up the numbers of female and male characters in several of this summer’s highest-grossing films. Among the main characters in Godzilla (which I’m defining as anybody with an actual name) there are 19 men and 4 women. Transformers: Age of Extinction has 7 major male characters, 3 human female characters, and 8 male robots. X-Men: Days of Future Past has 26 men and 7 women. Maleficent is the exception to the trend, with 10 lead female roles (including the actresses who played characters at different ages) and 6 male roles. Guess which film performed best among women?

    Vulture writer Kyle Buchanan recently brought up this issue with Matt Reeves, the director of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, my favorite summer blockbuster so far, in which only two women have names: a human doctor played by Keri Russell and an ape played by Judy Greer. In contrast, there are 19 named roles for male actors. Buchanan asked Apes director Matt Reeves about this discrepancy, and his answer — “It wasn’t a conscious decision. I don’t know.” — is very telling. For all the effort he poured into every detail of that movie, the thought of including more female characters never crossed his mind.

    Movies, and genre movies in particular, have suffered this male-female imbalance for a long time. It’s what Katha Pollitt, in 1991, dubbed “The Smurfette Principle,” noting that many stories about men contain a single, often stereotypical female character, thus establishing a world that is defined by men, in which women are peripheral. At least these days, filmmakers are making some effort to elevate these precious few roles. Russell’s character in Apes and Elisabeth Olsen’s character in Godzilla are doctors. Zoe Saldana’s character in Guardians of the Galaxy is a bounty hunter. The summer’s best female character, played by Emily Blunt in Edge of Tomorrow, is an army sergeant.

    But having just one or two female characters in a movie, even in relatively empowered positions, means that women in the audience are always going to be underserved. As Shana Mlawski wrote in the widely-circulated “Why Strong Female Characters are Bad for Women,” the emphasis on female characters being “sexy yet strong” often means that they lack any other personality traits: They can’t be funny, or vulnerable, or any other quality that makes a character relatable. Tasha Robinson’s essay on The Dissolve, “We’re Losing All Our Strong Female Characters to Trinity Syndrome,” applauds a few recent movies (How to Train Your Dragon 2, Pacific Rim, The Lego Movie) for creating great female characters, but notes that all of these characters ultimately step aside so that the male hero can save the day.

    Point being, these vastly outnumbered female characters are carrying far too much on their shoulders. They wouldn’t all have to juggle motherhood, romance, monster-fighting, and promising medical careers — then ditch it all when a damsel-in-distress is required — if there were more women to share these roles. That’s why we don’t just need more good roles for women; we need crappy roles, too. We need female characters who are bus drivers, students, villains, janitors, drug addicts, politicians, and superheroes. Hollywood is full of terrific, underemployed actresses of all types. There’s no reason that every miscellaneous role in a movie needs to default to “male.”

    By “crappy parts,” I’m not talking about giving all the tiny parts to women, though that would be something. I’m talking about splitting things clean down the middle. Take Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, for example. As Buchanan pointed out, Gary Oldman’s character could have easily been played by a woman, and the main character’s teenage son could have been a daughter. Half the ape society could have been female. None of these are particularly amazing roles, and making them women wouldn’t have changed the story one bit — yet it would have been quietly revolutionary.

    Or take Godzilla, which features some wonderful actors in thankless roles, and some wonderful actresses in even more thankless roles. It would have been very easy to switch any two male and female roles without otherwise altering the script. Juliette Binoche could have been the Godzilla-obsessed parent, rather than Bryan Cranston. Sally Hawkins could have been the main scientist, with Ken Watanabe playing Scientist Who Nods a Lot. And what if Elisabeth Olsen had been the bomb expert trying to save her city, and Aaron Taylor Johnson played the dad nervously waiting at home? That would have been something new.

    Pandering to women doesn’t make for a surefire hit, but there’s enough evidence that women turn out for movies in which they’re represented. Two summer films that performed far better than expected, the big-budget Maleficent and the indie The Fault in Our Stars, contained many parts for women (and, not for nothing, were marketed to female audiences). The mega-successful Hunger Games movies boast an onscreen gender ratio that is nearly 50/50. The Avengers owed 40 percent of its record-breaking opening weekend to women; though inarguably a male-dominated movie, it has one female lead and two key supporting female characters, and women actually appear onscreen nearly as often as the men.

    It’s not that female moviegoers are keeping a running tally of women and buying their tickets accordingly. It’s just that, when you’re consistently excluded, you start to notice. If women took up as much space onscreen as they do in movie audiences — 52 percent — films would look very different. Audiences would acclimate to the idea that female characters have their own stories. And perhaps those “strong female characters” would naturally emerge, instead of being shoehorned into the plot. When Matt Reeves says that excluding women from Apes wasn’t “a conscious decision,” I believe him. But that excuse is wearing thin. I want to see directors start making conscious decisions to include women — one crappy role at a time.

    — 2 days ago
    #where are the great female characters in blockbuster movies 
    Bad Medicine: Why Your Doctor Shouldn’t Use Wikipedia

Let’s ‘fess up: Most of us have logged on to Wikipedia to find information on an unexplained ailment — and, surprisingly, so have doctors. 

A recent report published by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics found that Wikipedia is, believe it or not, the single leading source of medical information for doctors. In fact, 70 percent of MDs use it as an “information source in providing medical care,” according to a study published in the Journal of Internet Medical Research. Not so reassuring, considering that 90 percent of medical information on the community-edited website is inaccurate, says research published by the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

“We compared the 10 conditions responsible for the most medical costs. For example, hypertension, back pain, and depression, then cross-referenced them with updated, peer-reviewed studies,” study author Hilary Gerber, MD, tells Yahoo Health. “Most of the information on Wikipedia was inaccurate.” Here’s one example, cited in a story published in Prevention: Wikipedia states that before doctors can make a diagnosis for hypertension, blood pressure readings from patients on three separate office visits were necessary, but national guidelines actually require only two readings. 

According to Gerber, though plenty of accurate info resides on Wikipedia, “there just wasn’t enough that was right.” But even if your doctor does log on every once in a while, he or she still has a medical degree and will most likely use good judgment. “It’s good that Wikipedia cites most of its content, however, you don’t know who is writing the articles so, at best, the site should be used for general reference, not to confirm a symptom or diagnosis,” Jeremy Fine, MD, a Los Angeles-based medical concierge internist, tells Yahoo Health. He suggests patients join the site UpToDate, a subscription service that, while expensive, is the most trusted source for medical information online. There’s also accredited free websites WebMD and the Mayo Clinic, as well as government sites such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Of course, consult your doctor before making decisions that would impact your health.

But how much should you trust your MD? That depends on how well you’ve done your research. Here are three ways to feel more at ease with your provider.

Research your doctor’s background: Visit the website for your state’s medical board (most provide free information) since it reveals any medical malpractice committed by a physician (keep in mind that you will only find settled, not pending lawsuits). If your state doesn’t post such info, you may still be able to obtain it if you call the medical board directly. Other options include searching for user reviews. 

Get a second opinion: There’s nothing wrong with consulting another expert if you’re hesitant to take your doctor’s advice or if your course of treatment simply isn’t working. And in light of recent research, which found that one in 20 people are misdiagnosed in outpatient clinics each year, it’s also downright smart. You won’t offend your doc and many even encourage patients to seek another opinion. First, ask your insurance company if it will cover a second office visit, then ask your doctor to send the new one a copy of your medical records. And make sure the two MDs are in communication before making any health decisions.

Check his credentials: Just because he’s an MD, doesn’t mean he is trained to meet your specific needs since anyone with a medical degree can practice any type of medicine. You can check out any doctor’s certification on the American Board of Medical Specialties.

And remember, no matter who is treating you, the best authority on your health is, oftentimes, you.

    Bad Medicine: Why Your Doctor Shouldn’t Use Wikipedia

    Let’s ‘fess up: Most of us have logged on to Wikipedia to find information on an unexplained ailment — and, surprisingly, so have doctors.

    A recent report published by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics found that Wikipedia is, believe it or not, the single leading source of medical information for doctors. In fact, 70 percent of MDs use it as an “information source in providing medical care,” according to a study published in the Journal of Internet Medical Research. Not so reassuring, considering that 90 percent of medical information on the community-edited website is inaccurate, says research published by the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

    “We compared the 10 conditions responsible for the most medical costs. For example, hypertension, back pain, and depression, then cross-referenced them with updated, peer-reviewed studies,” study author Hilary Gerber, MD, tells Yahoo Health. “Most of the information on Wikipedia was inaccurate.” Here’s one example, cited in a story published in Prevention: Wikipedia states that before doctors can make a diagnosis for hypertension, blood pressure readings from patients on three separate office visits were necessary, but national guidelines actually require only two readings.

    According to Gerber, though plenty of accurate info resides on Wikipedia, “there just wasn’t enough that was right.” But even if your doctor does log on every once in a while, he or she still has a medical degree and will most likely use good judgment. “It’s good that Wikipedia cites most of its content, however, you don’t know who is writing the articles so, at best, the site should be used for general reference, not to confirm a symptom or diagnosis,” Jeremy Fine, MD, a Los Angeles-based medical concierge internist, tells Yahoo Health. He suggests patients join the site UpToDate, a subscription service that, while expensive, is the most trusted source for medical information online. There’s also accredited free websites WebMD and the Mayo Clinic, as well as government sites such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Of course, consult your doctor before making decisions that would impact your health.

    But how much should you trust your MD? That depends on how well you’ve done your research. Here are three ways to feel more at ease with your provider.

    Research your doctor’s background: Visit the website for your state’s medical board (most provide free information) since it reveals any medical malpractice committed by a physician (keep in mind that you will only find settled, not pending lawsuits). If your state doesn’t post such info, you may still be able to obtain it if you call the medical board directly. Other options include searching for user reviews.

    Get a second opinion: There’s nothing wrong with consulting another expert if you’re hesitant to take your doctor’s advice or if your course of treatment simply isn’t working. And in light of recent research, which found that one in 20 people are misdiagnosed in outpatient clinics each year, it’s also downright smart. You won’t offend your doc and many even encourage patients to seek another opinion. First, ask your insurance company if it will cover a second office visit, then ask your doctor to send the new one a copy of your medical records. And make sure the two MDs are in communication before making any health decisions.

    Check his credentials: Just because he’s an MD, doesn’t mean he is trained to meet your specific needs since anyone with a medical degree can practice any type of medicine. You can check out any doctor’s certification on the American Board of Medical Specialties.

    And remember, no matter who is treating you, the best authority on your health is, oftentimes, you.

    — 2 days ago
    #doctors